Plants can be toxic to dogs

Know which plants are toxic.

Many dogs will eat grass and other plants, so it’s good to know which plants are toxic or might be harmful otherwise.

  • Wild mushrooms often grow in the early summer in moist places in the lawn, on tree trunks and on firewood. Don’t rake or mow them as that spreads spores to grow more ‘shrooms. Wear a glove or a baggie, pick them and put them in the trash. No, they are NOT for the compost bin.
  • Weeds – Since some weeds like purslane are toxic to pets, there’s another good reason to keep your yard weed free.
  • Foxglove digitalis – can cause heart failure.
  • Lilies – cause GI upset and day lilies can cause renal failure in cats.
  • Bulbs – most spring-blooming bulbs like tulips and daffodils are toxic if the dog digs them and chews them up. It’s the same for the rhizomes of iris plants.
  • Tall ornamental grasses – if dogs ingest these plants, the sharp grass blades can cut their stomachs and create serious medical issues.
  • Toxic fruits and veggies include: plants in the onion family, rhubarb, chamomile, grapes (including raisins) and the seeds of stone fruits.

If you have a concern about some of the plants in your yard, call us and we can help you identify the safe steps to removing or replacing your plants for a pet-safe landscape. If your pet has become sick or injured, click to visit a local veterinarian to receive immediate medical assistance.

Click for list of Reno veterinarians

IREM Property Maintenance Class

IREMSteve at Signature Landscapes dropped by the IREM Chapter 89 class last month to share some landscape insights with the class. Indeed it was a fun breakfast and we were glad to have had the opportunity to speak with the group.

If your company would like to learn more about how landscaping could affect your bottom line, please give Steve Fine a buzz via email at, or just call at (775) 857-4333.

From the IREM Chapter 89 Newsletter (


IREM Chapter 89 held the Property Maintenance and Risk Management (MNT 402) class in Reno NV in March 2012. This class was extremely informational and valuable. We had a very knowledgeable instructor (Penny Tourangeau) and had several vendors come in and share their specialty and experience with us. Everyone who attended this class benefited! Please inform Jessica Folmer of any classes you would like to bring to Reno NV. We will do everything we can to make it happen.

We will also like to thank our speakers during this class. Their knowledge was extremely helpful and very much appreciated.

via Newsletter | iremnnv.

Northern Nevada Drought – Things you should know as you program your irrigation clocks

It’s a warm, dry spring and we’ve known for months the Truckee Meadows is in for a very dry summer.

So…other than an extremely elevated FIRE season, what does this mean for all of us who have a front lawn to mow, veggie seeds in the ground and a some trees to offer cools shade on the hot side of the house?  Can we tend to our plants and still save water?

Lawn watering tip for now through mid-June:  After watering the grass, let the top 1/2″ of the soil dry out before watering again.  This is when the roots are growing deep to seek water in the soil.  By letting that top 1/2″ dry out, you’re building a more healthy, drought tolerant lawn.

Here are some things to consider:

  1. While landscapes do take water, they also give back. Landscaping is part of our eco-system that cleans the air, shades buildings, mitigates pollution in both the air and storm water, produces food and cools the urban environment. Landscapes give back to us much more than they take.
  2. Water-deprived landscapes become unhealthy ones that are susceptible to weeds and disease. Even in dry times, we need to protect the long-term value of our landscapes while conserving water. LOW water does not mean NO water. We simply need to water responsibly.
  3. Now is the time to get busy and do the things that save water–like simple, budget-friendly upgrades to the sprinkler system.  Irrigation clocks/timers/controllers are terribly sophisticated these days – and the price on the good ones are surprisingly affordable. Plus they’re very user friendly!

Remember Xeriscapes from years gone by?  Now a globally-known concept, it was invented in Colorado about 30 years ago and its principles apply today.  Xeriscape isn’t a “look” or a specific kind of landscape, rather, it’s a whole system that starts in the soil and ends with a rich plant palette and vibrant healthy landscape.

What it looks like in your yard is up to personal preference and individual interpretation that comes about with a good design.  If you’re planning to renovate or installing a new landscape this year, check out what Xeriscape really means, because that vision of rocks and yucca plants is nothing more than pure urban legend!

Call our Landscape Design Center at (775) 857-4333 and schedule a free consultation to help visualize how a water-smart landscape could actually save you money while looking the best on the block.

Plus, all new landscapes qualify for our 180-Days Same-As-Cash landscape and paver program. So you can take your own sweet time to pay a landscape to last you and your family a lifetime.

Second Annual Cal-Neva Border Blitz Nets 16 Phony Contractors

Individuals on probation for theft and burglary were among those who bid on the Lake Tahoe area projects.

via Second Annual Cal-Neva Border Blitz Nets 16 Phony Contractors.

We cannot stress enough, the importance of hiring legitimate, licensed and bonded companies for your landscape (or any other work) projects.

The decks are stacked against you the minute you agree to let them on your property. If you have any concerns about a current contractor working for you, give us a call. We’ll try to help you out of any pickle you find yourself in.

Call us at (775) 857-4333 to learn more about the benefits of a reputable, licensed landscape company, like Signature Landscapes.

Page 4 of 4 1234