X-FEST Music Brews and Peace Concert Downtown

XFEST 2012  |  Music. Brews. Peace.

Harrah’s Plaza 2012
July 21, 2012 | 4pm – 10pm

$10 ENTRY FEE INCLUDES THREE TASTER TICKETS
Additional taster tickets can be purchased for $1 each
Proceeds benefit our favorite organization in the entire earth:
Keep Truckee Meadows Beautiful

THE BANDS

Tim Snider
Whitney Myer Band
Jelly Bread

Tickets can be purchased at the plaza entrance the day of the event

THE BREWS

High Sierra Brewery
Sierra Nevada
B.J.’s Brewing
Great Basin Brewing Company
Silver Peak Brewing
Under Cover Ale Works


Click this link for the official XFEST 2012 Poster (in Adobe PDF)

Harrah’s Reno – Plaza
219 N. Center St. | Reno, NV 89501 | (775) 788-2900  | http://www.harrahsreno.com
Map to this location

 

Grow your own – UNCE Gardening Classes to take this summer

Coming this summer to a Cooperative Extension Office near you! Visit this site to learn all about this summer’s GROW YOUR OWN “back to basics guide to great harvests in Nevada”.

> Here’s a link to the brochure for the Grow Your Own class and price listing:  Summer Grow Your Own Brochure

They have outlets in all these Nevada cities:

  • Carson City
  • Elko
  • Gardnerville
  • Hawthorne
  • Logandale
  • Owyhee
  • Reno
  • Tonopah
  • Winnemucca
  • Yerington

Signature’s Landscape Olympics and Safety Day

Employees spend entire day reviewing, performing and learning landscape safety, ethics and skills.

From tree pruning to chainsaw safety, more than 75 Signature employees went thought the first annual Landscape Olympics and Safety Day.

Part of a thorough education program put on by award-winning safety professional, Jim Stanhouse, the day-long effort targeted teams in the field all day long.

Click to learn more about Signature Landscapes’ award winning safety program.

Signature Wins Best Safety Program at BANNer Awards

In 2007 the leadership of Signature Landscapes identified a number of strategies required to put our company mission and core values into action. With a full staff of 200-plus laborers working with dangerous tools and equipment every day, it was quickly decided substantial success would be achieved through the development and implementation of a robust, company-wide Safety Education and Enforcement program.

Specifically we wanted to address and provide credence to the two following:

1) Excerpt from our mission statement:
Providing innovative landscape solutions, enriching our community with service though valued and exceptional employees with a commitment to influential industry leadership.

2) Excerpt from our core values:

  1. Teamwork made up of exceptional employees with quality and pride in their work
  2. Create opportunity for personal, professional and company growth
  3. To have a profitable company to build value, and ensure our future
  4. Be the industry leader in all that we do

Fewer Accidents, Lower EMR (MOD rate), Lower Lost-Day Rates

> Constant safety message hits home the value of a Zero-Injury workplace


Our safety program is centered on two key areas: Accident Prevention and Safety Education.

Accident prevention is considered a primary importance in all phases of operation and administration. To ensure these goals are met, procedures have been put into place and are enforced daily since program inception.

Safety education comes in a variety of formats and frequencies. Due to the transient nature of our employee pool, a simple education program has paid off and safety continues to be a top training topic every season.  Each new topic is hand delivered weekly to every employee and followed up with a manager’s discussion and overview of the subject.

Topics are prioritized by historical recurrence as well as event driven. For example, just 18 months ago, a tragic accident occurred on a local freeway (not Signature related) where a couch flew off of a trailer only to cause a horrible accident and loss of life. The next business day our teams were instructed in the proper tie-down procedures for large loads.

Insurance-related claims have dropped 20%  and hospital visits due to accidents are down 45% since 2008. Automotive incidents have substantially decreased since the program launch. Employees can quickly reference any safety topic or procedure by reviewing a complete Safety Reference binder in each division’s ready-room. Signage is also posted around the building to alert and educate employees on key safety topics.

Nevada’s Cheatgrass Problem in Detail

The significant problem facing large communities this summer is the threat of Cheatgrass igniting in or near structures. Large swaths of the invasive species have raised fire dangers to critical levels over the years. It’s an easily ignited and fast-burning menace to public safety for communities near open spaces

As we all experienced this spring, we had and extremely dry entry into the summer season. It only takes a quick glance outside your window to see the effects this has on our landscapes – cheat grass everywhere you look. We’ve reposted a few main ideas here previously published by many universities and governmental organizations, including some information from the great Ed Smith, of the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension.

The cheatgrass invasion of vast areas of the West is uniquely intertwined with fire. Cheatgrass has increased the frequency and size of wildfires, and these fires have in turn allowed cheatgrass to expand its dominance.

Rangeland Ecolology & Management | March 2011


Cheatgrass
is one of the most notorious invasive species in the Truckee Meadows, causing dramatic and almost irreversible degradation of natural communities. As temperatures warm and cheatgrass growth rises… and the threat of enhanced fire activity rises right along with it.

It quickly colonizes disturbed arid lands and, once established, creates the conditions necessary for it to flourish. Growing quickly over the winter and dying after setting seed in early summer, cheatgrass leaves a dense cover of fine, highly flammable fuel. This abundance of fuel increases the frequency of fires, prevents the re-establishment of native plant species, and makes more space for cheatgrass. The cycle continues until large areas are covered with nothing but a cheatgrass monoculture.

Some level of cheatgrass presence may indeed be inevitable in the LTB, but ignoring the threat of further invasion and the factors that abet it could lead to serious ecosystem consequences. The most effective way to reduce the impact of invasive species is to identify new occurrences and eradicate them.

Predictive Modeling of Cheatgrass Invasion Risk for the Lake Tahoe | 10-2010

Cheatgrass typically completes its life cycle as a winter annual. It produces highly flammable standing dead biomass in early summer following seed production, greatly increasing the likelihood of subsequent fire.

Drier sites, especially those highly disturbed (e.g., close to roads and urban areas), were more suitable for cheatgrass than wetter, undisturbed sites. Quick action should be taken if cheatgrass establishment is documented.

Seed mortality is greatest with fires that burn while seeds are still attached to the plant, especially just before seed shatter in the summer. Removal of the grass before seeds begin to drop is always preferred.

Control and Management:

  • Manual cheatgrass control – Fire, mowing, grazing, tillage, and inter-seeding of competitive native plants have all been shown to reduce populations of cheatgrass.
  • Chemical cheatgrass control:  Cheatgrass can be effectively controlled using any of several professionally applied herbicides. But its effectiveness is limited by the environmental conditions during the cold early spring and early fall when pre-emergents should be applied, mainly lack of a suitable water supply to activate chemicals. This is when a competent landscape management company can really make a dent in the application of these herbicides.
It’s really about managing the threat. We’ve found a combination of labor, herbicides and time can effectively keep cheatgrass out of the large open areas near neighborhoods, schools and commercial buildings. As long as we’re constantly on top of the threat, we can one step closer to a FIRE-SAFE landscape.

Lebo Newman, Owner/Partner, Signature Landscapes

Signature Wins Back Meadowood Mall

Signature Landscapes is proud to serve Meadowood Mall once again

Signature is proud to announce our former client, Meadowood Mall, has once again enlisted the our premiere landscape management service to supervise all facets of the mall’s 8-plus acres of exterior landscape and maintenance responsibilities. By addressing the needs of the mall and understanding the acute challenges of such a large and mature landscape, Signature will again serve Meadowood and its thousands of daily customers starting July 1st.

Signature previously managed the property from 2002 to 2009 and is thrilled to welcome such a important customer back to organization.

Signature Welcomes Back Carson Medical Center

After a three year hiatus with in-house operation, Signature can call
this world-class organization a client once again!

Cancer Center Fountain designed and installed by Signature Landscapes.

In December 2005, Carson Tahoe Regional Medical Center opened the doors of its new expansion to the public. Soon afterward the facility was acclaimed for its innovative and functional landscape design, hardscape features, and practical application of the healing environment concept.

Signature Landscapes is extremely proud to have been the primary landscape services contractor for the medical center since day one. With more than 15 miles of irrigation and multiple landscape awards, the 80-acre campus continues to thrive, just as the healthcare provider continues to serve the community. And Signature is proud to have helped in its development along the way.

This month, Signature Landscapes is pleased to announce the medical campus’ decision to move the role of landscape management to an outsourced program led by the Signature team, previously an in-house operation since 2008.

Managed by Signature Landscapes from breaking dirt through 2008, the hospital took the maintenance duties in-house in an effort to reduce expenses. During this time, the landscape company continued to help develop numerous projects along the way, including the award winning Cancer Center’s Chartres Labyrinth and rose garden, as well as care and maintenance of several related properties such as the Sierra Surgery Hospital and the Cancer Center.

The Signature team would like to publicly welcome such a wonderful partner back into the exclusive club and hope the innovative collaboration in landscape excellence continues for years to come.

Defensible space: Your first line of defense

Defensible Space Treatments

Defensible space treatments are an essential first line of defense for residential structures. The goal of the treatments is to significantly reduce or remove flammable vegetation within a prescribed distance from structures.

Defensible space reduces the fire intensity and improves firefighter and homeowner chances for successfully defending a structure against oncoming wildfire.

NOTE: This information is taken from the www.livingwithfire.info, an incredibly helpful tool for the community during this hot fire season. Please visit this link, send to your friends, and take efforts to learn more about how to make your property fire-safe this year.

 

Fire slowly moving in Mt. Rose corridor

Property Owner Recommendations

  • Remove, reduce, and replace vegetation to create defensible space around homes according to the guidelines in the Defensible Space Guidelines fact sheet.
    (Download the Defensible Space Guidelines fact sheet for Washoe County)
    This area should be kept:

    • Lean: There are only small amount of flammable vegetation.
    • Clean: There is no accumulation of dead vegetation or other flammable debris.
    • Green: Existing plants are healthy and green during the fire season.
  • Store firewood a minimum distance of thirty feet from structures.
  • Mow or remove brush growing against fences in the community. The minimum distance for clearance should be ten feet in grass and 25 feet in brush.
  • Enclose areas under wood decks and porches when possible or maintain these areas to be free of weeds and other flammable debris. Box in eves and cover ventilation openings with very fine metal wire mesh to prevent embers from entering the attic and crawl spaces.
  • Clear all vegetation and combustible materials around propane tanks for a minimum of ten feet.
  • Clear weeds and brush to a width of ten feet along both sides of the driveways.
  • Maintain a minimum clearance of thirty feet from the crown of trees that remain within the defensible space zone. Keep this area free of smaller trees, shrubs, and other ladder fuels.
  • Trim and remove tree branches a minimum of fifteen feet from the ground, but not more than one-third the tree height, to reduce ladder fuels on all deciduous and coniferous trees within the defensible space zone. Prune all dead and diseased branches.
  • Prune all tree branches to a minimum distance of fifteen feet from buildings, paying special attention around chimneys.
  • Mow grass within the defensible space zone to maintain a maximum height of four inches.
  • Thin sagebrush and other shrubs to a spacing between shrubs that is equal to twice the shrub height.
  • Immediately dispose of cleared vegetation when implementing defensible space treatments. This material dries quickly and poses a fire hazard if left on site.
  • Where possible, irrigate all trees and large shrubs that remain in close proximity to structures to increase their fire resiliency. This is especially important during drought conditions.
  • Maintain the defensible space as needed.
  • Replace wood shake roofs with fire resistant roofing materials.

 

Visit the LivingWithFire.info Learning Center

This LivingWithFire.info Learning Center includes a wide array of educational materials and links to other useful resources to help you learn how to reduce the wildfire threat to your family, home and community. Most of the materials were prepared by the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension faculty and have been peer reviewed to ensure relevance and accuracy. Topics range from pre-fire activities such as creating defensible space, to advice on safe evacuation practices, to what to do when returning home after a wildfire. These materials are available in written, interactive and video formats, with some available in Spanish, allowing you to use the format that works best for you.

Truckee River Fun & Safety Fair this Saturday

Visit this site to get all the info!

Get Ready for the River Fun & Safety Fair | July 14 | Truckee River Foundation.
Click Here for Event Flyer

Attention all water-ready parents and kids who want to have a fun and safe time on the Truckee this season. The Truckee River Safety Fair is back in town and we’re expecting a giant turnout.

  • West Wingfield Park
  • Saturday, July 14th
  • Registration @ 9am
  • Classes start at 10, 11, 12:30, 1:30
  • Whitewater Safety
  • All Classes are FREE
  • FREE Helmets & Lifejackets to the First 200 Participants

Plants can be toxic to dogs

Know which plants are toxic.

Many dogs will eat grass and other plants, so it’s good to know which plants are toxic or might be harmful otherwise.

  • Wild mushrooms often grow in the early summer in moist places in the lawn, on tree trunks and on firewood. Don’t rake or mow them as that spreads spores to grow more ‘shrooms. Wear a glove or a baggie, pick them and put them in the trash. No, they are NOT for the compost bin.
  • Weeds – Since some weeds like purslane are toxic to pets, there’s another good reason to keep your yard weed free.
  • Foxglove digitalis – can cause heart failure.
  • Lilies – cause GI upset and day lilies can cause renal failure in cats.
  • Bulbs – most spring-blooming bulbs like tulips and daffodils are toxic if the dog digs them and chews them up. It’s the same for the rhizomes of iris plants.
  • Tall ornamental grasses – if dogs ingest these plants, the sharp grass blades can cut their stomachs and create serious medical issues.
  • Toxic fruits and veggies include: plants in the onion family, rhubarb, chamomile, grapes (including raisins) and the seeds of stone fruits.

If you have a concern about some of the plants in your yard, call us and we can help you identify the safe steps to removing or replacing your plants for a pet-safe landscape. If your pet has become sick or injured, click to visit a local veterinarian to receive immediate medical assistance.


Click for list of Reno veterinarians

Page 13 of 16 «...101112131415...»