Prevent Backflow Theft

Winter is quickly approaching and we are scheduling your irrigation system shutdown. Over the last few years we have seen a tremendous increase in the theft of backflows

products-shsc-featured1

Due to this increased theft we recommend removal of you backflow(s) and storing in a secure off-site location. We are offering services to prevent a possible urgent expense of up to $6,000 later in the season.

Why wait to protect your investments until it is too late? Theft comes when you least expect and then you can’t provide enough protection fast enough. The good news is that we can help prevent these thefts from reoccurring at a fraction of the costs involved for total replacements.

Replacing these backflows can cost as much as $6,000!

While the scrap metal value for the brass and copper contained within these fittings is only about $250, brazen thieves are making short work of stealing as many as they can, sometimes twice from the same properties!

products-shg-headerThe thieves drive up, sometimes dressed in orange vests to look like city employees, take a saw and cut the valve off at the pipes. The whole process can take less than two minutes.

These thefts have occurred in broad daylight and also have happened at prominent and visible locations.

Their removal by thieves will also interrupt water service for your property and tenants as well as the possible water damage created from the water running uncontrolled through the open connection.

CLIPPING FROM THE RGJ.COM

The city of Reno in Nevada lost more than $100,000 last year from scrap-metal thefts - and it wasn't alone. Cities across Nevada detailed similar problems on Wednesday to lawmakers considering a bill to increase penalties for such crimes. Officials from Henderson, North Las Vegas, Las Vegas and Reno all testified in support of SB37 before the Assembly Judiciary Committee. "These problems are an indication of our times," said Cadence Matijevich, assistant city manager of Reno. "People are desperate and looking for materials they can turn and sell for a quick profit." Current law classifies scrap-metal theft based on the monetary value of the stolen material, with possible penalties including fines, prison time and community service. In general, the thefts are considered misdemeanours if the value is less than $650. If it exceeds $650 but is less than $3,500 it's a felony punishable by up to five years in prison. A thief who takes more than $3,500 could land behind bars for 10 years. The bill under consideration by the assembly mandates 100 hours of community service for a first offence, 200 hours for a second offence, and 300 hours for third and subsequent violations. Previous legislation that increased penalties for stealing copper - one of the more valuable scrap metals - has done little to curtail the problem, Matijevich said. Of Reno's $103,000 in losses last year, $27,000 came from a single incident when thieves took copper wiring from a downtown railroad trench, Matijevich said.

 

 

Are the communities you manage protected from the devastating risk of fire?

KNOW THE LAW
“Persons owning, leasing, controlling, operating or maintaining buildings or structures requiring defensible spaces are responsible for modifying or removing nonfire-resistive vegetation on the property owned, leased or controlled by said person.”
International Wildland-Urban Interface Code, 603.2 Fuel modification


Drought & Defensible Space

Figure 603.2

Figure 603.2 (enlarge)

WHAT IS DEFENSIBLE SPACE?

Defensible Space is the area around a structure where vegetation has been modified to reduce the fire threat. The size of your defensible space will vary, depending upon property size, location, and topography. Sometimes a defensible space is simply a homeowner’s properly maintained backyard. Yet another property owner might need to provide over 200 feet of defensible space around their property.

Start the Spring with Fire Safety

There are a few simple things homeowners can do to help protect their property before a wildfire.


 

SIGNATURE’S DEFENSIBLE SPACE TEAM WILL ALWAYS:

  • Reduce vegetation by pruning, hand crews or mowing
    Space between plants & trees removes the continuous fuel bed that might otherwise exist
  • Remove dead & flammable vegetation from slopes
    Debris, branch piles, & various materials add up to become fuel for even the smallest sparks.
  • Replace flammable vegetation with less hazardous choices
    Shorter plants are better than taller plants & nonwoody plants are better than evergreens or junipers.

defensible-guidelines

Water & Managing Drought

Quick Facts about Watering During A Dry Winter

  • Water trees, shrubs, lawns, and perennials during prolonged dry fall and winter periods to prevent root damage that affects the health of the entire plant.
  • Water only when air and soil temperatures are above 40 degrees F with no snow cover.
  • Established large trees have a root spread equal to or greater than the height of the tree. Apply water to the most critical part of the root zone within the dripline.

Signature PDF Guideook – Managing Drought

Dry air, low precipitation, little soil moisture, and fluctuating temperatures are characteristics of fall and winter in our area. Often there is little or no snow cover to provide soil moisture from October through March. Trees, shrubs, perennials and lawns under these conditions may be damaged if they do not receive supplemental water.

The result of long, dry periods during fall and winter is injury or death to parts of plant root systems.

Affected plants may appear perfectly normal and resume growth in the spring using stored food energy. Plants may be weakened and all or parts may die in late spring or summer when temperatures rise. Weakened plants also may be subject to insect and disease problems.

DROUGHT GUIDELINE: Download PDF for managing large landscapes during drought

Plants Sensitive to Drought Injury

Woody plants with shallow root systems require supplemental watering during extended dry fall and winter periods. These include European white and paper birches; Norway, silver, red, Rocky Mountain and hybrid maples; lindens, alders, hornbeams, dogwoods, willows, and mountain ashes. Evergreen plants that benefit include spruce, fir, arborvitae, yew, Oregon grape-holly, boxwood, and Manhattan euonymus. Woody plants also benefit from mulch to conserve soil moisture.

Herbaceous perennials and ground covers in exposed sites are more subject to winter freezing and thawing. This opens cracks in soil that expose roots to cold and drying. Winter watering combined with mulching can prevent this damage.

Lawns also are prone to winter damage too! Newly established lawns, whether seeded or sodded, are especially susceptible. Susceptibility increases for lawns with south or west exposures.

Watering Guidelines
Water only when air temperatures are above 40 degrees F. Apply water at mid-day so it will have time to soak in before possible freezing at night. A solid layer (persisting for more than a month) of ice on lawns can cause suffocation or result in matting of the grass.

Plants receiving reflected heat from buildings, walls and fences are more subject to damage. The low angle of winter sun makes this more likely on south or west exposures. Windy sites result in faster drying of sod and plants and require additional water. Lawns in warm exposures are prone to late winter mite damage. Water is the best treatment to prevent turf injury (see fact sheet 5.505, Clover and Other Mites of Turfgrass.)

Monitor weather conditions and water during extended dry periods without snow cover – one to two times per month.

Newly Planted vs. Established Plants
Newly planted trees are most susceptible to winter drought injury. Trees generally take one year to establish for each inch of trunk diameter. For example, a two inch diameter (caliper) tree takes a minimum of two years to establish under normal conditions.

Trees obtain water best when it is allowed to soak into the soil slowly to a depth of 12 inches. Methods of watering trees include: sprinklers, deep-root fork or needle, soaker hose or soft spray wand. Apply water to many locations under the dripline and beyond if possible. If using a deep-root fork or needle, insert no deeper than 8 inches into the soil. As a general survival rule, apply 10 gallons of water for each diameter inch of the tree. For example, a two-inch diameter tree needs 20 gallons per watering. Use a ruler to measure your tree’s diameter at 6″ above ground level.

Newly planted shrubs require more water than established shrubs that have been planted for at least one year. The following recommendations assume shrubs are mulched to retain moisture. In dry winters, all shrubs benefit from winter watering from October through March. Apply 5 gallons two times per month for a newly planted shrub. Small established shrubs (less than 3 feet tall) should receive 5 gallons monthly. Large established shrubs (more than 6 feet) require 18 gallons on a monthly basis. Decrease amounts to account for precipitation. Water within the dripline of the shrub and around the base.

Herbaceous perennial establishment periods vary. Bare root plants require longer to establish than container plants. Perennials transplanted late in the fall will not establish as quickly as those planted in spring. Winter watering is advisable with late planted perennials, bare root plants, and perennials located in windy or southwest exposures.

 

 

Thanks to the Colorado State University, U.S. Department of Agriculture and Colorado counties cooperating.CSU Extension programs are available to all without discrimination. No endorsement of products mentioned is intended nor is criticism implied of products not mentioned.

by J.E. Klett,  Colorado State University Extension horticulture specialist and professor, horticulture and landscape architecture; and R. Cox, Extension horticulture agent, Arapahoe County. 1/04. Revised 3/13.

 

Winter drought will take a toll on your landscape

A winter watering program will save your trees & shrubs

According to the Reno Gazette-Journal, if the snow levels continue at this rate, it will be the driest four-year period since 1990-92. Warm winters without snow appeal to people, but cause harmful winter drought. Specifically, the lack of soil moisture and atmospheric humidity can damage tree and plant root systems unless they receive supplemental water on a regular basis. This can trigger a cascade of effects on overall tree and overall landscape health. By reducing a plant’s ability to take up water and nutrients, particularly during spring bud break, winter root damage limits subsequent stem and branch growth in summer. In turn, this can contribute to tree mortality and may even explain pockets of dead trees.

You see, trees may look inactive going into winter but the fact is they continue to regulate their metabolism and only slow down some physiological activities. This decrease in photosynthesis and transpiration begins a tree’s dormant phase. Trees still continue to slowly grow roots, respire and take in water and nutrients.

help-trees-survive-the-drought

A simple & visual guide to watering your trees during the winter drought

Why this matters now

Your tree & plant roots suffer from weeks of zero moisture.

Weaker trees and plants are more susceptible to outside pests and disease.

Plants will put energy into rebuilding the damaged root structures before flourishing in the springtime.

 

Contact Christina, your Customer Service Diva today to set up a winter watering program to ensure the health and vitality of your landscape investment this year.

Call: (775) 857-4333
Email: info@siglands.com

 

Learn more about our winter drought conditions from the media:

  • KTVN Channel 2 News: http://www.ktvn.com/story/24360015/drought-continues-into-new-year
  • KTVN Channel 2 News: http://www.ktvn.com/story/24420480/federal-water-master-says-drought-taking-its-toll-on-rivers-and-streams
  • RGJ.com: http://www.rgj.com/article/20140113/NEWS1801/301130022/Waiting-more-white-stuff-Snow-still-rare-resorts-retailers-challenging-season

 

Carson Tahoe Named Nation’s 5th Most Beautiful Hospital

A hospital that makes patients feel better on arrival? It’s true, beautiful hospitals have been shown to speed healing. And Carson Tahoe Regional Medical Center has just been recognized for its commitment to the patient, being named the fifth most-beautiful hospital in the U.S. by Soliant Health, one of the largest healthcare staffing companies in the country.

Signature Landscapes couldn’t be more excited for the hospital and is proud to have installed this amazing landscape years ago – and still maintains this beautiful facility today.

most_beautiful_hospitals-2014“There is a special feel to hospitals with inviting public spaces and soothing private rooms,” said Gale Yochum, a nine-year Soliant operating room travel nurse. “Patients who feel satisfied with the facility may recover faster and have shorter stays, which is good for both hospital and patient.”

Soliant judges said they could see this hospital being used as an exterior location for any number of big-budget Hollywood sci-fi movies. In the words of hospital officials, the newly-constructed facility is meant to celebrate the wonders of the natural world that surrounds it, “capturing and embracing the healing forces of nature’s elements.”

If you would like to learn more about the Carson Tahoe Health facility, simply visit www.carsontahoe.com. Article photo by: Richard Stokes for CTRH Publication.

Water Conservation Tips for HOA’s and Large Commercial Properties

The challenge of watering Homeowners Associations (HOAs) and other large commercial properties during a drought can be greatly reduced by using proven maintenance practices, integrating irrigation technology designed to water more efficiently and incorporating Xeriscape principles.

 

Following are practical tips provided by Signature’s landscape experts to help large properties keep landscapes healthy while using less water.

Tip #1: Determine the best water plan

drip-hoaIn communities where mandatory water restrictions have been enacted, large properties are typically faced with two irrigation options: watering on assigned days or participating in a designated water budget program. Because many commercial properties with large landscapes need more flexibility to deliver water to all their irrigation zones, property managers may elect to use a water budget. Water budgets determine a certain number of inches per year, gallons per square foot, or percentage reduction of water use based on evapotranspiration (ET). If using a water budget, the property can normally be watered any day of the week, but is limited to a prescribed amount of water. Irrigation professionals can help develop a program that is best for the property.

Tip #2: Perform proper irrigation maintenance

Improving irrigation system efficiency is one of the best ways to save water and money not only in a drought year, but every year. At system start-up and throughout the watering season, the system should be checked for leaks and broken heads and repaired promptly. Heads should be straight and not obstructed by tall grasses or plants.
Spray heads that mist or fog are indicators that the water pressure is too high and wasting water. Installing pressure-regulating devices will save water and help apply water directly to the plants.
Replacing mismatched nozzles and installing higher efficiency nozzles also save water. Many water providers offer rebates on high-efficiency nozzles, so be sure to check rebate qualifications online or ask your landscape contractor. Drip irrigation is recommended for watering trees, shrubs and flower gardens.
Drip irrigation systems are water efficient because they are not as susceptible to water loss due to evaporation, wind or surface runoff.

Tip #3: Incorporate water-saving technology

etsystemSmart controllers, also known as evapotranspiration (ET) controllers, measure soil type and characteristics, precipitation rates, plant water requirements, and weather to deliver only the amount of water needed. Controller types, features and costs vary, and some brands allow the entire system to be maintained remotely via the Internet.
Another important and inexpensive technology is a rain sensor, which prevents the irrigation system from watering during a rainstorm. Many water utilities offer rebates on water-saving technologies.

Tip #4:  Xeriscape

Xeriscape is more than a garden style or type of plant. It is a comprehensive approach to landscaping that combines seven landscaping principles to conserve water. The process includes proper design, soil prep, appropriate plant selection, water efficient irrigation, practical turf areas, mulches and appropriate maintenance. Converting all or part of an existing property to Xeriscape is another way to save water.

Tip #5: Schedule watering based on site conditions

Several factors must be considered when setting watering schedules on large properties, including soil, slope, plant types, exposures and existing irrigation technology. To adequately determine frequency and duration of watering, water application rates, soil characteristics, plant needs, weather variation and the capabilities of your irrigation technology must also be considered. For example in May, the controller might be scheduled to apply only 50 percent of the peak water budget that would be applied during the heat of July.
The amount of water applied at any one time should not exceed the infiltration rate of the soil or water will run off. Newer controllers allow for multiple start times so that the cycle- and-soak method can be utilized for better infiltration.

Tip #6: Hire a Pro

Not all landscape contractors are irrigation efficiency experts. When interviewing contractors, ask for water-saving successes from their work on similar-sized properties.
It is important to select a contractor who understands the principles of water management and also has the expertise to operate new technology. Providing the contractor the property’s water bill will help him better assess how to employ water saving measures.

 

greencoThis fact sheet is part of the Green Industries of Colorado (GreenCO) education series. GreenCO is an alliance of seven trade associations representing all facets of horticulture and landscape industries. This educational material is courtesy of GreenCO and made possible through a Water Efficiency Program Grant from the Colorado Water
Conservation Board (CWCB).

Homebuilders association recognizes top builders, projects | nnbw.com

Signature is a proud winner of a BANNer Awards Trophy this year! Thanks to everyone at the Builders Association of Northern Nevada who helped put on an incredible event this Friday!

  • Outdoor Lifestyle AwardSingle family residence: Signature Landscapes, Enloe Residence.
  • Most outstanding subcontractor: Signature Landscape (nominated by KDH Builders/Jenuane Communities).

via Homebuilders association recognizes top builders, projects | nnbw.com.

Signature Landscapes Sweeps Top Awards At Nevada Landscape Association Gala

Local landscaper, Signature Landscapes, was the recipient of the most prestigious award for Northern Nevada landscapers; the President’s Award, for their work at the renowned Schaffer’s Mill Sports Complex in Truckee, California. Receiving the award during the Nevada Landscape Association’s annual award gala, was Tim Laskowski, construction manager for the landscape contractor.

"It’s been an extremely busy year for Signature, and this award really goes out to our guys who put their blood, sweat and tears in this property," said Laskowski. "And to win for such an incredibly beautiful building, it makes it that much more satisfying."

Signature’s installation team was responsible for all aspects of hardscape (paver and stonework) around the entire complex including the pool area and the extensive labyrinth of pathways throughout the 7.4-acre clubhouse village. The complex includes a pool, hot springs bathing area, several restaurants, a sports shop, large fitness center and Schaffer’s Square, a community gathering spot.

The company’s work for the sports complex was also recognized for several other outstanding awards. Signature was awarded 1st Place for the Hardscape Installation category;  receiving a perfect 10 on the scoring chart – an achievement rarely seen in the award’s history.

The Schaffer’s Mill work also received the Environmental Award for acute awareness for building water efficient and environmentally balanced landscapes that do not sacrifice the quality of the design nor the quality of life for the project overall.

Finally, the company also took home the Large Commercial Installation for the project.

“We’ve never seen one of our projects sweep the top of the field like the Schaffer’s Mill project,” said Laskowski. “It’s a testament to every facet of our installation team, from our guys in the trenches to the managers running the big picture, they really stepped up and took this landscape to heart!”

Signature Landscapes was the recipient of several other awards at the event such as their first place work for Carson Tahoe Regional Medical Center, and a number of residential homes. The company was awarded the President’s Trophy last year for their work on the large Shakespeare Ranch property in Glenbrook, Tahoe.

 

2013 NEVADA LANDSCAPE ASSOCIATION AWARDS for Signature Landscapes

  1. Presidents Award: Schaffer’s Mill Sports Complex
  2. Environmental Award: Schaffer’s Mill Sports Complex
  3. Large Commercial InstallationSchaffer’s Mill Sports Complex
  4. 1st Place Hardscape Installation: (perfect 10) Schaffer’s  Mill Sports Complex
  5. Large Commercial Installation: Lyon County Detention Facility
  6. 1st Place Large Commercial Maintenance: Carson Tahoe Regional Medical Center
  7. 1st Place Large Residential Installation: Enloe Residence – ALSO OUTDOOT LIFESTYLE AWARD WINNER for The 2013 BANNer Awards!
  8. 3rd Place Large Commercial Maintenance: Reno Corporate Center
  9. 2nd Place Medium Commercial Maintenance: Sandhill Business Center
  10. 1st Place Small Residential Installation: Lumsden Residence

Common Landscape Irrigation Problems

No two landscapes are alike

That’s why Signature Landscapes  installs some of the most diverse, durable and precise irrigation components in the industry. Whatever landscape problems you might have, be worry-free knowing Signature Landscapes has an efficient, hassle-free solution.

PROBLEM: Watering Slopes or Hills
Water can puddle or pool around sprinklers installed at the bottom of slopes or hills, causing soggy areas, which can kill grass or encourage fungus to grow.

SIGNATURE LANDSCAPES SOLUTION
3500 Rotors and 5000 Rotors with a Seal-A-Matic™ (SAM) Check Valve stop the problem of low head drainage and eliminate puddling. Or use Rain Bird Rotary Nozzles which deliver water at a lower rate, allowing sufficient soak-in time to prevent run-off.

December Blood Drive – Schedule Appointments Online

Help BANN and the Builders Association Charity (BAC) spread holiday cheer by participating in the Big Give BACk.

What better way to spread holiday joy than to give back to our community here in Northern Nevada. The Builders Association of  Northern Nevada along with the Builders Association Charity (BAC), is hosting The BIG Give BACk this holiday season. There will be tons of food and snacks – and lunch too! So please help this holiday season. Lots of appointment times left.

or CALL us at (775) 857-4333

 

NEW Online Donation Scheduling is easy, secure and guarantees your spot!

Here’s how you can help:

  •  Toy Drive – Donate new unwraped toys for ages infant to17 yrs.
  •  Food Drive – Donate non perishable food items.
  •  Blood Drive – December 11th 8 am – 3:30 pm at the BANN office. Sponsored by yours truly, Signature Landscapes. Please call us at 775-857-4333 to schedule an appointment.
Mix it Up - Join us for a Networking Mixer, December 5th from 5-7 pm at the BANN office.

The Builders

The cost of admission is 2 non perishable food items or 1 new unwrapped toy. It’s a great networking opportunity and an easy way to give back to our community! Please RSVP to Tina at the Builders, register online or download a flyer.

Food & Toy Collection bins will be located at the BANN office (Mon-Fri 9am – 5pm) and at 5 Star Athletics, 3760 Barron Way, Reno 89511( Mon – Thurs 5-8pm) November 1st through December 11th. Flyer

   Click to download the flyer: BANN Give Back 2012


 

Page 1 of 2 12