Signature Welcomes Back Carson Medical Center

After a three year hiatus with in-house operation, Signature can call
this world-class organization a client once again!

Cancer Center Fountain designed and installed by Signature Landscapes.

In December 2005, Carson Tahoe Regional Medical Center opened the doors of its new expansion to the public. Soon afterward the facility was acclaimed for its innovative and functional landscape design, hardscape features, and practical application of the healing environment concept.

Signature Landscapes is extremely proud to have been the primary landscape services contractor for the medical center since day one. With more than 15 miles of irrigation and multiple landscape awards, the 80-acre campus continues to thrive, just as the healthcare provider continues to serve the community. And Signature is proud to have helped in its development along the way.

This month, Signature Landscapes is pleased to announce the medical campus’ decision to move the role of landscape management to an outsourced program led by the Signature team, previously an in-house operation since 2008.

Managed by Signature Landscapes from breaking dirt through 2008, the hospital took the maintenance duties in-house in an effort to reduce expenses. During this time, the landscape company continued to help develop numerous projects along the way, including the award winning Cancer Center’s Chartres Labyrinth and rose garden, as well as care and maintenance of several related properties such as the Sierra Surgery Hospital and the Cancer Center.

The Signature team would like to publicly welcome such a wonderful partner back into the exclusive club and hope the innovative collaboration in landscape excellence continues for years to come.

Defensible space: Your first line of defense

Defensible Space Treatments

Defensible space treatments are an essential first line of defense for residential structures. The goal of the treatments is to significantly reduce or remove flammable vegetation within a prescribed distance from structures.

Defensible space reduces the fire intensity and improves firefighter and homeowner chances for successfully defending a structure against oncoming wildfire.

NOTE: This information is taken from the www.livingwithfire.info, an incredibly helpful tool for the community during this hot fire season. Please visit this link, send to your friends, and take efforts to learn more about how to make your property fire-safe this year.

 

Fire slowly moving in Mt. Rose corridor

Property Owner Recommendations

  • Remove, reduce, and replace vegetation to create defensible space around homes according to the guidelines in the Defensible Space Guidelines fact sheet.
    (Download the Defensible Space Guidelines fact sheet for Washoe County)
    This area should be kept:

    • Lean: There are only small amount of flammable vegetation.
    • Clean: There is no accumulation of dead vegetation or other flammable debris.
    • Green: Existing plants are healthy and green during the fire season.
  • Store firewood a minimum distance of thirty feet from structures.
  • Mow or remove brush growing against fences in the community. The minimum distance for clearance should be ten feet in grass and 25 feet in brush.
  • Enclose areas under wood decks and porches when possible or maintain these areas to be free of weeds and other flammable debris. Box in eves and cover ventilation openings with very fine metal wire mesh to prevent embers from entering the attic and crawl spaces.
  • Clear all vegetation and combustible materials around propane tanks for a minimum of ten feet.
  • Clear weeds and brush to a width of ten feet along both sides of the driveways.
  • Maintain a minimum clearance of thirty feet from the crown of trees that remain within the defensible space zone. Keep this area free of smaller trees, shrubs, and other ladder fuels.
  • Trim and remove tree branches a minimum of fifteen feet from the ground, but not more than one-third the tree height, to reduce ladder fuels on all deciduous and coniferous trees within the defensible space zone. Prune all dead and diseased branches.
  • Prune all tree branches to a minimum distance of fifteen feet from buildings, paying special attention around chimneys.
  • Mow grass within the defensible space zone to maintain a maximum height of four inches.
  • Thin sagebrush and other shrubs to a spacing between shrubs that is equal to twice the shrub height.
  • Immediately dispose of cleared vegetation when implementing defensible space treatments. This material dries quickly and poses a fire hazard if left on site.
  • Where possible, irrigate all trees and large shrubs that remain in close proximity to structures to increase their fire resiliency. This is especially important during drought conditions.
  • Maintain the defensible space as needed.
  • Replace wood shake roofs with fire resistant roofing materials.

 

Visit the LivingWithFire.info Learning Center

This LivingWithFire.info Learning Center includes a wide array of educational materials and links to other useful resources to help you learn how to reduce the wildfire threat to your family, home and community. Most of the materials were prepared by the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension faculty and have been peer reviewed to ensure relevance and accuracy. Topics range from pre-fire activities such as creating defensible space, to advice on safe evacuation practices, to what to do when returning home after a wildfire. These materials are available in written, interactive and video formats, with some available in Spanish, allowing you to use the format that works best for you.

Truckee River Fun & Safety Fair this Saturday

Visit this site to get all the info!

Get Ready for the River Fun & Safety Fair | July 14 | Truckee River Foundation.
Click Here for Event Flyer

Attention all water-ready parents and kids who want to have a fun and safe time on the Truckee this season. The Truckee River Safety Fair is back in town and we’re expecting a giant turnout.

  • West Wingfield Park
  • Saturday, July 14th
  • Registration @ 9am
  • Classes start at 10, 11, 12:30, 1:30
  • Whitewater Safety
  • All Classes are FREE
  • FREE Helmets & Lifejackets to the First 200 Participants

Plants can be toxic to dogs

Know which plants are toxic.

Many dogs will eat grass and other plants, so it’s good to know which plants are toxic or might be harmful otherwise.

  • Wild mushrooms often grow in the early summer in moist places in the lawn, on tree trunks and on firewood. Don’t rake or mow them as that spreads spores to grow more ‘shrooms. Wear a glove or a baggie, pick them and put them in the trash. No, they are NOT for the compost bin.
  • Weeds – Since some weeds like purslane are toxic to pets, there’s another good reason to keep your yard weed free.
  • Foxglove digitalis – can cause heart failure.
  • Lilies – cause GI upset and day lilies can cause renal failure in cats.
  • Bulbs – most spring-blooming bulbs like tulips and daffodils are toxic if the dog digs them and chews them up. It’s the same for the rhizomes of iris plants.
  • Tall ornamental grasses – if dogs ingest these plants, the sharp grass blades can cut their stomachs and create serious medical issues.
  • Toxic fruits and veggies include: plants in the onion family, rhubarb, chamomile, grapes (including raisins) and the seeds of stone fruits.

If you have a concern about some of the plants in your yard, call us and we can help you identify the safe steps to removing or replacing your plants for a pet-safe landscape. If your pet has become sick or injured, click to visit a local veterinarian to receive immediate medical assistance.


Click for list of Reno veterinarians

Keep Truckee Meadows Beautiful receives $5,000

New Math: $5,000 = $11,500 and growing for local nonprofit leader Keep Truckee Meadows Beautiful

Lebo Newman and Kate Thomas

In spite of the economic downturn local nonprofit Keep Truckee Meadows Beautiful has found an innovative way to keep donor funds flowing through dollar for dollar matches with local landscape contractor, Signature Landscapes.  Now this innovative community organization is looking for other area businesses to match Signature Landscapes’ match.  The landscaper will donate $5,000 in a dollar-for-dollar donation match for quality-of-life leader, Keep Truckee Meadows Beautiful.   “Contributions have become more difficult to come by in this economic climate,” states Christi Cakiroglu, Executive Director of Keep Truckee Meadows Beautiful (KTMB).  According to Cakiroglu, as a “non-government agency operating solely on the charity of the community, this matching plan provides much needed support for ten education and beautification programs.”

“A couple of years ago we saw the economic downturn coming and thought, how can we help our individual supporters help us?” recalls Cakiroglu.  “Signature Landscapes immediately got our vision and stepped in with a $5,000 match.”  Since 2009 this dollar for dollar match has more than tripled KTMB’s individual donor giving, and now Signature Landscapes and KTMB are challenging other businesses to match Reno Lawn and Landscapes’ match.  “This is the second year of this program and KTMB has exceeded their original goal.  We would like to see other businesses support their programs,” stated Lebo Newman, owner-partner of Signature Landscapes.

Marketing director for Signature Landscapes, Steve Fine, is excited to partner with the non-profit. “We really hope the residents of the Truckee Meadows can rise to the challenge and take full advantage of this match,” says Fine. “KTMB is so dedicated to maintaining our high-quality of living – both within and around our neighborhoods. It’s been an easy decision to support them.”  According to Fine our community has benefited from a number of long-running volunteer and service programs “many of which you probably didn’t know were run by KTMB.”  Take recycling for example.  “Have you ever recycled your old phone book at local drop-off locations? They have recycled more than 100 tons of these old books this year. What about your Christmas tree after the holiday?  You and your neighbors were able to recycle 11,000 these trees just last year thanks to this organization.  And the chips help year-round in park, river and open space projects to prevent weeds, erosion and promote beautification.”

 

About Keep Truckee Meadows Beautiful

Keep Truckee Meadows Beautiful is a private 501(c)3 nonprofit, dedicated to creating a cleaner, more beautiful region through education and active community involvement. KTMB is supported by individual and community donations.  KTMB’s ten programs include Adopt-A-Park, Adopt-A-Spot, the Annual Litter Index, Christmas Tree and Phone Book Recycling, Neighborhood, Open Space and River Cleanups, and educational programs including Waste Warriors and Paper Making Workshops.  Visit www.ktmb.org for weekly blog posts and to volunteer.

Contact:  Christi Cakiroglu, Executive Director
KeepTruckeeMeadows Beautiful
(775) 851-5185

IREM Property Maintenance Class

IREMSteve at Signature Landscapes dropped by the IREM Chapter 89 class last month to share some landscape insights with the class. Indeed it was a fun breakfast and we were glad to have had the opportunity to speak with the group.

If your company would like to learn more about how landscaping could affect your bottom line, please give Steve Fine a buzz via email at steve@siglands.com, or just call at (775) 857-4333.

From the IREM Chapter 89 Newsletter (http://iremnnv.com/newsletter/)

“MNT 402 WAS A GREAT SUCCESS!!!”

IREM Chapter 89 held the Property Maintenance and Risk Management (MNT 402) class in Reno NV in March 2012. This class was extremely informational and valuable. We had a very knowledgeable instructor (Penny Tourangeau) and had several vendors come in and share their specialty and experience with us. Everyone who attended this class benefited! Please inform Jessica Folmer of any classes you would like to bring to Reno NV. We will do everything we can to make it happen.

We will also like to thank our speakers during this class. Their knowledge was extremely helpful and very much appreciated.

via Newsletter | iremnnv.

Northern Nevada Drought – Things you should know as you program your irrigation clocks

It’s a warm, dry spring and we’ve known for months the Truckee Meadows is in for a very dry summer.

So…other than an extremely elevated FIRE season, what does this mean for all of us who have a front lawn to mow, veggie seeds in the ground and a some trees to offer cools shade on the hot side of the house?  Can we tend to our plants and still save water?

Lawn watering tip for now through mid-June:  After watering the grass, let the top 1/2″ of the soil dry out before watering again.  This is when the roots are growing deep to seek water in the soil.  By letting that top 1/2″ dry out, you’re building a more healthy, drought tolerant lawn.

Here are some things to consider:

  1. While landscapes do take water, they also give back. Landscaping is part of our eco-system that cleans the air, shades buildings, mitigates pollution in both the air and storm water, produces food and cools the urban environment. Landscapes give back to us much more than they take.
  2. Water-deprived landscapes become unhealthy ones that are susceptible to weeds and disease. Even in dry times, we need to protect the long-term value of our landscapes while conserving water. LOW water does not mean NO water. We simply need to water responsibly.
  3. Now is the time to get busy and do the things that save water–like simple, budget-friendly upgrades to the sprinkler system.  Irrigation clocks/timers/controllers are terribly sophisticated these days – and the price on the good ones are surprisingly affordable. Plus they’re very user friendly!

Remember Xeriscapes from years gone by?  Now a globally-known concept, it was invented in Colorado about 30 years ago and its principles apply today.  Xeriscape isn’t a “look” or a specific kind of landscape, rather, it’s a whole system that starts in the soil and ends with a rich plant palette and vibrant healthy landscape.

What it looks like in your yard is up to personal preference and individual interpretation that comes about with a good design.  If you’re planning to renovate or installing a new landscape this year, check out what Xeriscape really means, because that vision of rocks and yucca plants is nothing more than pure urban legend!

Call our Landscape Design Center at (775) 857-4333 and schedule a free consultation to help visualize how a water-smart landscape could actually save you money while looking the best on the block.

Plus, all new landscapes qualify for our 180-Days Same-As-Cash landscape and paver program. So you can take your own sweet time to pay a landscape to last you and your family a lifetime.

Support your local farmers this Saturday

Biggest Little Cooperative in the West

Support your local farmers this Saturday at the Grand Opening Block Party and Seedling Sale.

Where (map): Great Basin Community Food Coop, 240 Court Street in Reno
When: Saturday, May 26th from 9am to 1pm

The Grand Opening event will showcase the best of sustainable organizations in northern Nevada, including our finest organic and natural farmers and producers, independent crafters, urban gardeners, educators, and bicyclists.

Court Street will be closed off for a farmers’ market style setup with local farmers selling fresh, local, green seedlings and edible plants for your garden. These plants have been carefully nurtured from area farmers, from as far away as Mewaldt & Lattin Farms in Fallon, Churchill Butte Farms in northern Lyon county, and from local growers like Loping Coyote farms and Reno High School’s Sustainable Agriculture Project.

Support local!

Reposted from Local Food Network email!

Award Winning Night Gives Signature Two Landscape Trophies

  • BEST RESIDENTIAL LANDSCAPE UNDER $1 MILLION
  • BEST OUTDOOR LIVING

Brian Dean, ISA, ASCA

Our design and installation team walked away with two huge awards for Residential Landscape Artistry at the 2011 BANNer Awards. Our resident Plant Guru, Brian Dean, was the fellow in charge of the evening as he picked up the two awards. That’s him in the snappy vest! Click the two links below to find out how we did it – and view some nice photos too!

Contact our Landscape Design Center to learn a little more about the award-winning Signature Landscapes design and consultation process. We’re so proud of these homes and we really want to thank the home owners for allowing us to spread our wings and design such beautiful work!

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