Trees are people too!

Drip Line IllustrationSometimes we take our trees for granted because they are always there and don’t turn brown as fast as a heat-stressed lawn. We forget that they, too, can be water-deprived. Right now, your tree needs to soak up water–and nutrients–to survive the dormant season.

So how do you help your trees?

Water them now and water once per month through October. Use a deep root watering device that attaches to a garden hose and soak the soil 6 to 8 inches deep.

To know where to water, draw an imaginary circle of where the outermost branches extend over the ground.  That circle is called the drip line of the tree.  Water at various points within this drip line.  Be sure to probe and water some points that are closer and some points that farther away from the trunk as you move around the tree.

Fertilize?  The deep-root watering device can also deliver fertilizer while you water.  But wait until about Labor Day to add fertilizer.  Look specifically for a fall blend that has the micro-nutrients that are beneficial for the fall fertilization.

Remember, Signature Landscapes has two skilled and knowledgeable ISA Certified arborists on staff to help you with your tree questions. Call us at (775) 857-4333 and we’ll work to keep your gentle giants happy, healthy and ready for the coming winter.

Signature Landscapes voted BEST LANDSCAPER

You read that right! Signature Landscapes voted #1 Landscaper in Northern Nevada in the 2012 Reno News and Review’s Best of Northern Nevada reader’s choice contest. Otherwise known as the Reno News & Review’s Biggest Little Best of Northern Nevada. And just in case you missed the Best Of’s from prior years, this is our SECOND first place win!

So…

Thank you, Northern Nevada!

We love you! There’s nothing else we’d rather be doing than serving each and every one of you all year long. Landscaping is our passion, our art and our way of life, and we couldn’t do it without your business.

LINK TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW BEST-OF ARTICLE

Best of Northern Nevada

PHOTO GALLERY OF SIGNATURE’S BEAUTIFUL LANDSCAPES

Landscape Design Gallery

Heat stress on your lawn

Just like any other living creature in Northern Nevada, your lawn can suffer serious heat stress symptoms. Caused by high heat and lack of rainfall, dry summers and lack of humidity, we’re seeing heat stress is really take a toll on our local lawns.

Consistent watering is one of the most important practices in taking care of your lawn right now. 

 But be alert – temperatures over ninety degrees day after day can cause a slowdown in grass growth. With our low humidity, the blades of grass can experience a daytime wilt which can cause a loss of color normally associated with a healthy lawn. But don’t stress yourself…this does not necessarily mean the lawn is dying or in serious trouble.

Your grass is comprised of 80% water. High heat and low humidity takes some of this away, even with good watering practices – hence the wilting. But properly watered lawns will recover much more quickly than a drought stressed yard when the longer nights and cooler days return.

Water at least 2 to 2 1/2 inches per week. One inch of water should re-wet the soil about 6 inches deep. To determine how much water has been applied, set a straight-sided can under the sprinkler.

And remember, without adequate water, your heat stressed lawn will quickly turn into drought stressed lawn.

In a drought stressed lawn, grass soon turns brown and becomes dormant. An early clue to drought stress is when grassy areas show a dark bluish-green cast. Begin applying water when the soil starts to dry out and before the grass wilts and has a chance to become brown.

A word of caution about limited watering: A single watering during a high heat and/or drought period is likely to do more harm than good. If the grass cannot be kept actively growing with sufficient water, it is best to let the grass go dormant. Inconsistent or “light” watering during extended dry periods will slow the rate of recovery when adequate rainfall does occur. Bluegrass is very resilient and will come out of the heat and drought quickly as long as it is properly cared for and steps are taken to keep insects and weeds out of the stressed or dormant areas of the lawn.

Some things you can do when water restrictions prevent you from watering as much as the lawn really needs:

  1. Make sure your irrigation timer/clock is set to provide all the water your grass needs this month.
  2. Water only that part of the lawn where improvement is most important.
  3. Use a sharp mower blade; the cleaner the cut the less water the grass blades will lose out of the injury done by the cutting.
  4. Mow regularly until growth slows, but at a higher (rather than lower) cutting height.
  5. Make each watering consistent and make sure enough water is being applied to moisten soil to a good depth.
  6. Remember, with our losw humidity, a ten minute watering of most sprinkler systems will not likely get enough water into the soil. This will force the roots to go shallow and weaken the lawn’s resistance to heat stress and drought stress/damage.

If you have questions about your irrigation timer, how to propertly adjust for this high heat, don’t hesitate to call us. Our PLANET Certified Irrigation Technicians can quickly help get your lawn’s watering needs on track.

Call Signature Landscapes at 827-5296 and we’ll come out immediately!